It’ll Make a Good Scar Someday

A little boy in mud-stained jeans
Atop his small, red bike takes off
And peddles hard down a cracked sidewalk.
In tow proud dad lifts tired gaze
In time to witness his dear boy
At last achieve his longed for dream.

But then, as first times sometimes do,
Son’s takes a fateful turn as soon
As he realizes dad’s strong hand
Has left the seat of his red bike.
Now lacking confidence he jerks
The bike and meets the street beneath.

Dad, catching up to his hurt son,
Untangles him from his wrecked bike.
His muddy knees are now stained red,
And tears stream down his pain-filled face.
Son cries and asks, “What happened, Dad?”
As he holds son close dad whispers,

“One day the pain of your skinned knee
Will cease, and all you’ll see will be
A mark, a witness, of this day.
Though now the ‘why’ is so unclear,
One day the scar will bring a smile,
When then, at last, you see its end.
It will make a good scar someday.”

A teenage boy in prime of life
Drives hard down field with seconds left.
With ball clutched close and eyes closed tight,
He charges forward at full speed.
The crowd screams loud and dad looks on
As son cuts distance to the goal.

But then, as long drives sometimes go,
A misplaced step on unev’n ground
Breaks son’s steady stride. He stumbles.
With all breaths’ held, son trips and falls.
His firm grip breaks; the ball is lost.
The scout has surely taken note.

As son lies stunned, sprawled on the ground,
He lifts his eyes in time to see
His enemy fall hard atop
The ball as time is up. They’ve lost.
Son hangs his head low, asking, “Why?”
But through the din he hears dad say,

“One day the pain of shattered dreams
Will cease, and all you’ll see will be
A mark, a witness, of this day.
Though now the ‘why’ is so unclear,
One day the scar will bring a smile,
When then, at last, you see its end.
It will make a good scar someday.”

A businessman, in suit and tie,
Is sure today will be the day.
His hopes run high for one account
That’s sure to yield impressive gains
And benefit his company.
He quickly makes his way to work.

But then, as life unfolds at times,
The businessman arrives to work
And finds a notice on his desk.
In one half second all is changed
By one pink note left by his boss.
The man cannot believe his eyes.

How could it be after so long
A faithful stint as he had served,
That now, like that, his career’s through?
Still dazed, and longing just to know
“Why now?”, the man collects his things.
Then softly through the grief he hears,

“Ev’n this pain of deep betrayal
Will cease, and all you’ll see will be
A mark, a witness, of this day.
Though now the ‘why’ is so unclear,
One day the scar will bring a smile,
When then, at last, you see its end.
It will make a good scar someday.”

Though from our point of view life seems
Like random acts of careless twists,
Who else but God could design this:
Young football star turned businessman,
Who’s then let go at career’s peak,
Becomes a businessman for Christ
In foreign markets void of light.

© 2011 Eric Evans

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4 thoughts on “It’ll Make a Good Scar Someday

  1. This reminds me of a story of two people arriving in Heaven. One person stood tall and proud- without a blemish. The other one stood scarred and bowed beneath his beaten body. The first one boosts to the Lord of how much more beautiful he was than the second man.
    The Lord replies, ” Where are your scars? Wasn’t there anything worth fighting for in the life that I gave you? ”
    And then He showed the proud man His scars.

    Thank you for your words.
    And thank you, Jesus, for healed scars.

    • “Remember the word that I said to you: ‘A servant is not greater than his master.’ If they persecuted me, they will also persecute you.” (John 15:20). I suppose scars should be expected.

      Grace and peace to you,
      Eric

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